Thursday, July 2, 2015

Invitation: Paris 2016 and the BAA

British Archaeological Association (http://thebaa.org/) conference in Paris. 
It will take place from 16-20 July 2016 at various monuments and in the lovely INHA. Please mark your calendars. 
BAA Paris 2016 will be fantastic opportunity to share our research and enjoy the city together!
 
I write in the hope that you have already heard about this call for papers but I am emailing to ensure that you know the details (and the imminent deadline). Also, would you please spread the word to other Paris-loving colleagues, students, and friends?
 
Submitted abstracts should be about 500-1000 words for a paper of 20-30 minutes on any topic related to material culture and 'The Powers that shaped the City [Paris].' The chronological scope of this conference will stretch from Late Antiquity until the Renaissance.
 
The deadline is VERY soon (1 July) so please do send your proposals ASAP to the convenors, Lindy Grant (l.m.grant@reading.ac.uk) and Meredith Cohen (mcohen@humnet.ucla.edu).
 

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Southern African Society for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Conference: 26-28th August, 2016

We are pleased to announce that the 23rd biennial conference of SASMARS will be held at Mont Fleur in Stellenbosch, South Africa on 26 – 28th August 2016.
“Texts and Transformations: Medieval and Early Modern Cultures”
Medieval and Early Modern societies weathered various socio-cultural transformations, ranging from economic developments to religious conflicts, across a range of different geographies and in urban and rural spaces.  How did poetry, theatre, prose, visual art, architecture, and other forms of art respond to such changes?  How do we historically understand and assess various kinds of social transitions?
Topics for this conference can include but are not limited to:
·Adaptions of classical texts and artworks
·Translation of texts and ideas
·Contemporary readings of old texts
·Cross-cultural interactions and influences
·Historical transitions and periodisation
·Religious reform
·Urban renewal and development
·Medieval and Early Modern studies in contemporary education
·Appropriations of Medieval and Early Modern culture
·Cultural responses to economic change
·Representations of political dissent and rebellion
·Utopias and dystopias
·Gender, sexuality, and social change
Deadline:  A conference proposal and a short biography toderrick.higginbotham@uct.ac.za by 30 November 2015.  Any inquires can be directed to the same email address.
The CFP has been posted to our website at http://sasmarsnewsletter.blogspot.com/
Please send other items for the newsletter to me by 12 July.

Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Carolingian Manuscripts in Gallica

The National Library of France is pleased to announce the launch in Gallica of a digital corpus giving access to the manuscripts the BnF Carolingian digitized. The short scientific descriptions that accompany them are extracted from the most complete records of the BnF online catalogue archives and manuscripts.

http://Gallica.BNF.fr/html/und/manuscrits/manuscrits-carolingiens

http://archivesetmanuscrits.bnf.fr/ead.html?id=FRBNFEAD000094744

This corpus is available on the homepage of Gallica, via the discover tabs / manuscripts.

Various access to manuscripts are possible by author, title, date, genre, decor.

All remarks, suggestions, etc. are welcome: 


Charlotte Denoël
Conservateur, chef du service des manuscrits médiévaux
Bibliothèque nationale de France
Département des manuscrits
58, rue de Richelieu
75084 Paris cedex 02
tel: 0153798283
fax: 0153798900
charlotte.denoel@bnf.fr

Digital humanities and cultural heritage: what relationship? Fourth AIUCD annual conference


Campus Einaudi - Lungo Dora Siena 100 - 10153 Torino

The AIUCD 2015 conference is dedicated to investigate the relationship
between the Digital Humanities and the broad field of Cultural Heritage,
a line of research that is open since the inception of the former.
On the one hand, the Cultural Heritage domain has been using digital
tools, processes and methodologies for quite a long time, but their use
does not imply a recognition of their role as scientifically qualifying.
On the other hand, galleries, libraries, archives and museums preserve
and provide access to a wealth of content that is the object of much
research carried out as part of the Digital Humanities.
It is therefore interesting to see if Digital Humanities tools and
methods have led and will lead to a redefinition of theoretical,
methodological and technical processes, up to an actual
re-conceptualization of knowledge in the Cultural Heritage field.

At least two issues indicate the existence of a connection: the
theoretical reflection on the management of information and data that
texts hold, which has been carried out as part of the management of
libraries, has important consequences for the whole wide area of the
Digital Humanities; in the context of research funding, the increasing
demand to describe what will be the public impact of planned research
identifies in a “relationship with society” topic a significant element
wide spread in the Cultural Heritage area. Furthermore, if on the one
hand the world of Cultural Heritage has started their own reflection
that also touches the Digital Humanities, on the other hand the Digital
Humanities are urged to communicate beyond the inner, often
self-referential,  circle of Academia, and to do this they are inspired
by the methods of communication and dissemination of knowledge that
belong to the Cultural Heritage world. In conclusion, a meeting of
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage is already under way, it is
necessary to act and facilitate a cooperation that results in being as
effective as possible for both fields.

As a sign of openness and willingness to cooperate with the Cultural
Heritage world, conference organization is entrusted to the Centro di
Ricerca Interdipartimentale per la digitalizzazione e la realizzazione
di Biblioteche Digitali Umanistiche - MEDIHUM Memoria Digitalis
Humanistica (Università di Torino).

We are therefore soliciting papers in particular on – but not limited to
- the following topics:

- Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage: integration, separation,
independence?
- what relationship among Museums, Libraries, Archives and Digital
Humanities?
- how do Digital Humanities fit in Museums, Archives and Galleries?
visualization, imaging, graphic representations, immersive environments
in the Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage areas;
- which impact on society for research projects’ output in  the Digital
Humanities and Cultural Heritage areas?
- Public History: Museums, Libraries and Archives today are privileged
mediators between the public and its past, DH methodologies however
require new figures, aware of the issues and opportunities offered by
the digital world;
- which forms may the collaboration between cultural institutions and
digital humanists take in digitization projects, text encoding, critical
edition, digital curation?
- experiences of projects using principles and methods of the semantic
web, and Linked Open Data research.

The contributions, to be submitted as a 500 words maximum abstract in
PDF format, must be loaded through the EasyChair platform at the URL:
https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=aiucd2015.

The deadline for submission of abstracts to the Programme Committee isscheduled for midnight of August 31st, 2015

All abstracts will be
subject to evaluation by the AIUCD conference Programme Committee.
Information with regard to the acceptance of abstracts will be
communicated to the authors by September 30th, 2015.

Further information on the conference, on the composition of the
Programme Committee and on how to register will be made available on the
conference web site at the URL: http://www.aiucd2015.unito.it/ (the web
site may not be online yet at the moment of publishing this
announcement).

[Link to announcement on the AIUCD web site:
http://www.umanisticadigitale.it/digital-humanities-e-beni-culturali-quale-relazione-quarto-convegno-annuale-dellaiucd/]

Saturday, June 20, 2015

Fourth AIUCD annual conference 17-19 December 2015

Digital humanities and cultural heritage: what relationship?

The AIUCD 2015 conference is dedicated to investigate the relationship
between the Digital Humanities and the broad field of Cultural Heritage,
a line of research that is open since the inception of the former.
On the one hand, the Cultural Heritage domain has been using digital
tools, processes and methodologies for quite a long time, but their use
does not imply a recognition of their role as scientifically qualifying.
On the other hand, galleries, libraries, archives and museums preserve
and provide access to a wealth of content that is the object of much
research carried out as part of the Digital Humanities.
It is therefore interesting to see if Digital Humanities tools and
methods have led and will lead to a redefinition of theoretical,
methodological and technical processes, up to an actual
re-conceptualization of knowledge in the Cultural Heritage field.

At least two issues indicate the existence of a connection: the
theoretical reflection on the management of information and data that
texts hold, which has been carried out as part of the management of
libraries, has important consequences for the whole wide area of the
Digital Humanities; in the context of research funding, the increasing
demand to describe what will be the public impact of planned research
identifies in a “relationship with society” topic a significant element
wide spread in the Cultural Heritage area. Furthermore, if on the one
hand the world of Cultural Heritage has started their own reflection
that also touches the Digital Humanities, on the other hand the Digital
Humanities are urged to communicate beyond the inner, often
self-referential,  circle of Academia, and to do this they are inspired
by the methods of communication and dissemination of knowledge that
belong to the Cultural Heritage world. In conclusion, a meeting of
Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage is already under way, it is
necessary to act and facilitate a cooperation that results in being as
effective as possible for both fields.

As a sign of openness and willingness to cooperate with the Cultural
Heritage world, conference organization is entrusted to the Centro di
Ricerca Interdipartimentale per la digitalizzazione e la realizzazione
di Biblioteche Digitali Umanistiche - MEDIHUM Memoria Digitalis
Humanistica (Università di Torino).


We are therefore soliciting papers in particular on – but not limited to
- the following topics:

- Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage: integration, separation,
independence?
- what relationship among Museums, Libraries, Archives and Digital
Humanities?
- how do Digital Humanities fit in Museums, Archives and Galleries?
visualization, imaging, graphic representations, immersive environments
in the Digital Humanities and Cultural Heritage areas;
- which impact on society for research projects’ output in  the Digital
Humanities and Cultural Heritage areas?
- Public History: Museums, Libraries and Archives today are privileged
mediators between the public and its past, DH methodologies however
require new figures, aware of the issues and opportunities offered by
the digital world;
- which forms may the collaboration between cultural institutions and
digital humanists take in digitization projects, text encoding, critical
edition, digital curation?
- experiences of projects using principles and methods of the semantic
web, and Linked Open Data research.

The contributions, to be submitted as a 500 words maximum abstract in
PDF format, must be loaded through the EasyChair platform at the URL:

https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=aiucd2015.

The deadline for submission of abstracts to the Programme Committee is
scheduled for midnight of August 31st, 2015. All abstracts will be
subject to evaluation by the AIUCD conference Programme Committee.
Information with regard to the acceptance of abstracts will be
communicated to the authors by 30th September 2015.

Further information on the conference, on the composition of the
Programme Committee and on how to register will be made available on the
conference web site at the URL:

http://www.aiucd2015.unito.it/

(the website may not be online yet at the moment of publishing this
announcement).

Friday, June 19, 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS: It Was A Very Good Year: The Impact of 1215 on the Medieval World

Keynote Speaker:  Professor Richard Helmholz, University of Chicago

The year 1215 will be known forever among medieval historians for two groundbreaking events, the Fourth Lateran Council of Pope Innocent III and the creation of Magna Carta by the barons rebelling against King John of England.

MMHC welcomes papers on any topic of medieval history, especially proposals for papers on topics relevant to the theme of the impact of 1215.

Please send abstract (300 words maximum) via email attachment to Linda Mitchell, Program Chair,mitchellli@umkc.eduDeadline for paper proposals: June 30, 2015.

Graduate students presenting on the Friday sessions receive a modest travel stipend of $150.  Indicate your affiliation, degree program, and academic status when submitting paper proposal.

For information about the conference or local arrangements, please email local host, Steve Stofferahn (Steven.Stofferahn@indstate.edu) and/or program chair, Linda Mitchell (mitchellli@umkc.edu).

In addition, we welcome paper proposals focusing on the debate surrounding the notion of the development of a “persecuting society” in medieval Europe especially after 1215.  

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

CALL FOR PAPERS: “The History of the Future: Reinterpretation, Adaptation, Corruption”

Brown University History Graduate Student Colloquium
9th Annual HGSA Conference – October 2-3, 2015

Keynote address: Felice Lifshitz (University of Alberta), “Changing the Past to Change the Future: Cinematic Medievalism and the Politics of Gender”

Historical events occur in the past, but history happens in the present, as narratives from earlier times are constantly reassessed, reinterpreted, and transformed. This process of reinterpretation is a great source of vitality for history, meaning that a subject is never closed, no matter how substantial the existing body of literature. The dynamism of history as an academic discipline is also demonstrated in its willingness to constantly adapt methods and ideas borrowed from other disciplines ranging from anthropology to economics. In recent years, the emergence of the digital humanities has illustrated how new technologies developed outside the discipline can be harnessed in scholarship and public engagement. Finally, an important relationship exists between the scholarly community and the general public in transferring and translating knowledge. Historians not only have a responsibility to present their research to the public, but also to respond to popular corruptions of scholarly ideas, leading to a dialectic of scholarly and popular conceptions of history.

How will we continue to reinterpret the historiographies of various subfields? Where do new methods of historical research fit in with older empirical work in archives and how can they complement one another? How do scholarly ideas influence the public and vice-versa? We invite graduate students in history (and those in other disciplines whose research is related) to present their research in an attempt to address these questions. This is much more than a conference—it will allow students to their papers in an environment that will provide constructive feedback, then continue this intellectual exchange through a working group, allowing for ongoing fruitful engagement with peers at Brown University and from the United States and abroad.

Potential submissions may include (but are not limited to) the following:
·Transnational and connected histories
·Interdisciplinary works that complement history with another discipline
·Longue durée histories, including those using new digital technologies
·Applications of gender, race, and postcolonial theory
·Use of unorthodox sources (e.g. television, overlooked print media, art, or architecture)
·Collective memory and popular interpretations of history
·Borderlands histories
·Colonial histories and subaltern studies, especially in previously overlooked regions
·Studies involving unconventional historical actors (environmental history, technopolitics)
·Scholarship on the production and transmission of knowledge

Submission Guidelines:
Deadline for submission of drafts is June 19th, 2015. Individual paper submissions should include a paper title, a (maximum) 250-word abstract, and (maximum) 125-word author bio. All submissions should also note whether or not they will require multimedia services (e.g. PowerPoint or video). Successful candidates will be notified in late July and will need to submit final papers by August 21st.

Please e-mail submissions and questions to: BrownHGSA2015@gmail.com


Sponsors: Dept. of Classics, The Cogut Center for the Humanities, Dept. of German Studies, Dept. of History, Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World, Dept. of Medieval Studies, Dept. of Modern Culture and Media, The Pembroke Center, Dept. of Religious Studies